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or six years. i feel like things change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think academia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con g
the sensata technologies plant to protest plans to move the factory to china, ending 170 jobs. a federal appeals court has rejected the group plan. his challenge of a funding ban in taxes. texas has sought to cut payments to planned parenthood and exclude it from a government funded health program for low- income women because it also provides abortions. the texas program offers cancer and health screenings as well as birth control to some 100,000 low-income women, about 40,000 of whom are served through planned parenthood. the court of appeals for the but circuit in new orleans declined to reconsider an earlier ruling upholding the ban. in response, texas governor rick perry immediately announced that texas will stop all payments to program participants affiliated with abortion providers. a recent george washington university study has warned texas will be unlikely to provide adequate care to the patients currently served by planned parenthood. the supreme court is set to decide today on whether to hear a challenge to the conviction of five former top officials with the holy land founda
of that technology. i congratulate him on taking out osama bin laden. i want to underscore the same point that the president made. i supported his action there. i felt the same as the president did. >> i think romney is leaning obama. >> it did not last long? >> we haven't heard an agenda for the president. >> team obama knows full steam ahead. the president went on a two-day battleground blitz this week or, as he calls it -- >> our 48-hour fly around campaign marathon extravaganza. >> speaking of extravaganza, did you hear about donald trump's big, huge, mega game changing bombshell announcement of president obama? yeah, neither did we. he did come out with this -- >> if barack obama opens up and gives his college records and applications and if he gives his passport applications -- >> you get the point. but the president got the last laugh. >> this all dates back to when we were growing up together in kenya. >> and from big hair to big bird. >> i'm glad to be the way i am. >> the halloween costume is already sold out this year with one man to thank. >> i like pbs, i love big bird. >> an
believe we have enough technology that we can prevent that to ever happen. of course, if they were a threat to america, we do have to take decisive action, we do have to show our might, and we have to make sure. but i don't want to get it to that point because, ladies and gentlemen, we have the technology. their bombs are not sophisticated enough, and they don't have it. we need to prevent them from getting that technology. we need to stop that immediately. but, of course, if our, if our sovereignty was ever threatened or our friends in the middle east, we need to go after them. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: much of what scott has said i agree with, we have to protect our friends in the middle east, and that certainly includes israel. i just want everybody to know how deeply i feel about protecting israel. but also doing well with moderate arab nations so that we can have a relationship over there. but let's face it, we simply cannot allow iran that is dedicated to to blitz ration of israel -- the obliteration of israel and others have a nuclear weapon. we're not going to let
technology is here to explain. even when they say it's not it is always about money messa: so first let's take a look at the day's maet headlines. a rough-and-tumble week for stocks ending a on a quiet note. better than expected u.s. third quarter gdp data could knot offset worries about corporate earnings the dow eked out a gain of three points. good year was one of the biggest losers wi shares tumbling more than 10%. the tire-maker missed third quarter estimates driven by weakness in europe. one bright spot was expedia. shar soared 15%. they posted strong third quarter earnings fueled by a sharp rise in hotel bookings. >>> now to our top story. some people are calling it "frankenstorm". others call it a nor'easter-cane combination hurricane, nor'easter snowstorm or nightmare. if you live on the east coast you call it scary. hurricane sandy is making its way up the eastern seaboard. it may hit critical refineries that process 3.1 million barrels of oil per day. you know what that means. gas prices could go right back up. patrick dehaan from gasbuddy.com joins me with more on this one.
with the technology before it's as secure as it probably should be. charlie has given some terrific talks about the incentive structures for software makers and whether or not they're properly in balance to make sure that they're secure with their software before they release it. but i'll let him speak for himself on that. >> host: well, mr. miller, if you would speak to that. >> guest: sure. so we're in a situation where we all run code that was written by a vendor like microsoft or apple or cisco or whoever. um, and the problem is it's very difficult to write secure code, code that's perfect with no vulnerabilities. and it's hard to measure whether a code is secure. so even an expert like myself, it's very difficult for me to tell you whether if given two programs, which one is more secure than the other. so it's hard to measure, and people don't want to necessarily pay for that. so we all want to buy the latest gadget, the latest iphone or whatever, and we don't really think to ourself how secure is it? maybe i shouldn't buy it because it's not secure. so companies, you know, they're out to
they rushed forward with the technology before it is as secure as it probably should be. charlie has given some terrific talks about the incentive structures of four software makers, -- for the software makers, and whether they are properly in balance with making sure the software is secure. but i will let him speak for that. f >> mr. miller, if you would speak to that? >> sure, we are in a situation where we all run code that was written by a vendor like microsoft or cisco or whomever, and the problem is is very difficult to write secure code. whetherhard to measure code is secure, so even an expert like myself, it is difficult for me to tell you given to programs which is more secure than the other. it is hard to measure and people don't want to necessarily pay for that. we all want to buy the latest gadget, the iphone that comes out or whatever, and we don't think to ourselves, how secure is this, maybe i should not by this because it is not secure. so companies, they are out to make money and that is what they are therefore, so they want to push products out the door, beat competitors,
in the power of technology. we believe in the power of people when technology works for you. to dream. to create. to work. if you're going to do something. make it matter. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. i'i invest in what i know.r. i turned 65 last week. i'm getting married. planning a life. there are risks, sure. but, there's no reward without it. i want to be prepared for the long haul. i see a world bursting with opportunities. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversification. choices. my own ideas. ishares. i want to use the same stuff the big guy
in the world. we're blessed with terrific soldiers and extraordinary technology and intelligence. but the idea of a trillion dollars in cuts through sequestration and budget cuts to the military would change that. we need to have strong allies. our association and -- and connection with our allies is essential to america's strength. we're the -- the great nation that has allies, 42 allies and friends around the world. and finally, we have to stand by our principles. and if we're strong in each of those things, american influence will grow. but unfortunately, in nowhere in the world is america's influence greater today than it was four years ago. >> all right. >> and that's because we've become weaker on each of those four dimensions. >> all right -- perfect. you're going to get a chance to respond to that because that's a perfect segue into our next segment, and that is what is america's role in the world. and that is the question. what do each of you see as our role in the world? and i believe, governor romney, it's your turn to go first. >> well, i -- i absolutely believe that america has a
sciences, and technology. >> off to the world of fashion now, which this we can be found not on the catwalks of milan, paris, or new york, but in south africa. >> that is right. african as well as international labels are showcasing the latest designs at the fashion week in johannesburg. >> african fashion has lately swung into the international spotlight with design is replacing bold colors and patterns with more contemporary designs. >> modern and confident -- the latest in south african fashion. the show was the hit of the festival. her cutting its creations have wowed critics. >> the techniques that i use, they make you feel -- like this one is not like what we know or what our people know. >> she is not the only hit designer here. african fashion has never been more popular. designers from ghana, morocco, and 10 other african countries have been showing off their creations in johannesburg. behind the scenes, for has been flying. african fashion is plugged into international trends. >> i am very excited because are looking and also the ladies, so i am hopingrything es
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for the teaching of english. and we are beginning to see more in the way of exchanges. modern technology has made an elective education a reality. i saw this firsthand. in an engineering competition and the university of colorado. american companies are actively involved in the kingdom's effort to improve k-12 curriculum. keep in mind that saudi arabia is spending 26% of their budget on education. it is third-seeded american educators and businesses are supporting in a big way this modernization effort. there is a careful manage before. saudi arabia took note of this and the government moved with a 138 billion program, all targeted towards the needs and concerns of the populations. i realized that there was criticism in some circles. as if they were buying half the population with increased subsidies. but i have to say but i have to say that the government response was much more sophisticated than that. at the time, we, in the embassy, we listen listened to the top issues facing the saudi arabian population with jobs, houses, will society, and the security apparatus. after it was announced, the p
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landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints that are traditional media do. and i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others. when they have classified information that they think would it -- jeopardize information to believe they bring the fact
transactions to a different, a different entity, a different central clearing entity. well, the technology of that is not really well understood at all, and it's hard to have confidence in that. but moreover, it's not clear that without some kind of government sponsorship or government backing or access the liquidity a central clearing facility will have the confidence to avoid, essentially, what would be a run. and while dodd-frank actually provides for some support to central clearing entities -- which, by the way, seems to go mostly unnoticed by critics who say, you know, we've eliminated government support, we've eliminated taxpayer support, we've eliminated the possibility of too big to fail -- we do have a provision that permits intervention to help in a modest way financial, financial utilities like central clearing facilities. however, that's not universal. there's no provision made in europe to support whether directly or indirectly any central clearing facility. so in my mind we've created a series of risks within the derivatives area that were nonexistent before we began this en
stuff and cool technology, we got back to the point where we had to fly download over back.and over the battlefield to get these guys to shoot at us that we could find them because for instance the army and marine helicopters were common and they can't protect themselves against missiles in tripoli. so kind of degenerated back into that. so i talk a little bit about that. it was fine over back dad one day and i'd heard some guy from the flavor for me talking about seeing a bear. and i'm thinking he's sniffing glue or his oxygen system is contaminated or something not right. i've looked at us i saw a giraffe from across baghdad. all the wild animals were running but it shows something you don't think about, you don't expect. stuff like that is a matter. and that kind of close is on what i think is a positive note. you know, i don't like it when you read nonfiction and the writers kind of had this catharsis may bleed all over the pages and you walk away thinking that was heavy, though his deep. this is a little bit more positive. again, how i saw it and how it felt to come home from y
the companies that are making technology and writing the code to shoulder the full cost, which i would argue involves creating a secure product. >> host: charlie miller what about when it comes to social media and the sharing of information that we as consumers do with google, facebook etc. etc.? does that lend itself to less secure networks? >> guest: it doesn't affect the network per se but what it does is, it puts a lot of our information and some of that prior information out there so if you never connected to the internet no one would know what you would do doing, if you are dating someone but with facebook information is there. it's still out there on a server somewhere so some back i could get to it if you wanted so i think if you consider that you know it well ago, no one would ever agree to carry around a tracking device, but now we all carry around cell phones and no one would have ever let anyone read your e-mail but right now a lot of us use e-mail and all of our e-mails are stored on it server at google so it's interesting we as a society of given our information out and whether
. 2012] >> tomorrow morning, we will talk about how polls are conducted and analyze. new technology challenges the industry. scott is our guest followed by a spotlight on colorado beginning with an overview of the state with curtis hubbard the denver post. and we will see how the republicans are campaigning with strategist sean tonner. and in analysis of president obama's strategy to elected democrats with rick palacio. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have a simple proposition. you can embrace the kind of approaches he has embraced. -- she has embraced. it has no new revenue, even for the wealthiest americans. it would require cuts in social security and medicare. or we can embrace a balanced approach. that is what i support. we can go back to the kind of rates we had under the clinton administration when people were doing well and the economy was growing. we're going to have to make tough choices. >> your bottle? >> it is amazing to me you can stand here having voted for chilean dollar deficits for the last four years, the largest increase in amer
but also information technology improvements that have made things possible that were not available in the past. but a lot of these programs are under pressure now. some of it is so explicit political attacks aimed at outreach programs and aimed at the policies that have made it easier for people and on the programs. we also know the state agencies are stretched very thin. there are a lot of demands on them and their funding has been caught and in some we're hearing stories of unemployment insurance and people calling and calling to apply for their benefits and just getting a busy signal over and over again. it is a real opportunity to think about how we can build on the progress we've made so far. how can we prevent it from wearing away and what improvements can we make in the future. in particular, the affordable care act or the health care reform presents an opportunity to make some improvements as we move forward. i am going to wave to reports also available outside of the coalition. one is specifically how the human service programs and their clients can benefit from health car
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
could do and bringing new technologies to north dakota. when i served on the commission and attorney general, i went to minnesota and hard-fought for the coal industry. i heard a lignite leader award. i am as committed to north dakota's energy industry as anyone can become a and i did not know there could be a better advocate and someone who would stand and say have been there, i have this experience, i can get the job done, and i a understand what those challenges are. that is what i am hoping to do when i go to washington, d.c., represent this growing industry and include in it biofuels and wind which the republican party has been very hostile to production tax credits. using every form of energy to make it work in this country. >> obviously, there is a problem. keystone is not built. it is not built because the senate majority leader has not brought it up for a vote. our president has been a post it as well. our coal industry, one of the things that has stunned me is the epa came out with new regulations on coal plants, and it was so stringent you could not build a new coal plant
thought that technology was bringing that about. that it was actually producing such increases in wealth that we would be able to have abundance with a fraction of the work. that people would then do it. but that bit of it hasn't come about. >> why? >> i think a number of explanations. one is that our society's become much more unequal than it was when canes was writing. the other is i think he underestimated the force of insatiability. the relative character -- >> you end up with new needs and new wants. if you have one car, you feel like maybe it will be even more fun to have three. in the book it seems to me -- correct me if i'm wrong -- briefly what you're saying is you need enough for a good what we would consider good or upper middle class in terms of material comforts, house, things like that. beyond that, the kind of constant accumulation of more stuff doesn't give you a good life. what gives you a good life is time spent with your family, building relationships, pursuing activities that you find interesting. >> yeah. well, we break it down into seven basic goods, as we call that
to rely on technology. we need to be strategic in how we go about -- have now? military. it might be smaller, but the most important thing for us is to make sure we have a strong economy in the world. that means making sure that we actually get something done and congress can get the economy back on track. i think we need to be able to react very quickly situations around the world, because many of them are much smaller. what we have done in the past, and congressman king is responsible for this, we have been involved in two wars that have taken a huge toll in human life and money as well. our debt is $6 trillion when he went in -- it is $16 trillion now. card. we have to make sure that before we go into conflict, we are prepared to do that. >> let's ask about what you just said -- you can reply to that. then, if you explain your measurement of u.s. power in the world. starting two wars. [laughter] >> not paying for them. >> i did not restart those wars. that has been repeated a number of times through the campaign. those things were started first of all in september 11 -- we were
and analyzed and how new technology challenges the polling industry. scott of the pew research center is our guest. followed by a political overview of the state of colorado. then a look at how mitt romney and the republicans are campaigning across the state with republican strategyis sean tonner, and later, an always of president obama's strategy to win the state and elect democrats. our guest is democratic party chair, rick palacio. washington journal receives tweets and e-mails every morning on c-span. >> we have a pretty simple proposition here. you can either embrace the kind of approach that congressman wilson embraced. a tea party approach to balancing the budget. it has no new revenue. and it's so draconian it would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time. or we can embrace a balanced approach. that's what i support. i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration, when those upper income earners were doing well and the entire economy was growing. we're going to have to make some tough choices, and a balanced approach is the
things that we have we learned a because of technology and other allies in the past decade. as as a continual demand, it seems for the resources to get adequate training and to keep to a readiness at the same time dealing with other things that makes this a much more complex issue than many might appreciate and one of the challenges is when it comes time to resources it is done adequately. sorry for the op-ed. but it's really important, and i found in my experience people don't quite understand this because they are not supposed to and i don't expect that they would know. >> tell me a little bit about in your experience what particular things in the tour by difficulties in the military you think have been particularly useful or would be useful in the situations to fight and extend security in the non-traditional ways. >> i can answer that in a lot of different ways. let me start with disaster response. there's been a lot of discussion and a lot of groups over the last eight or ten years about how does the military or other branches of the government, ngos, private enterpris
a future. persistent technology here in western massachusetts, this is a real opportunity for the future. only if there is a well-educated work force. that starts and home school, on into community colleges, and on into universities. i want to say this is about priorities. that is how i see it. there will not be a single, magic bullet. what the priorities. students will have to pick up more of the costs of student loans. twice, senator brown voted to let students rates double. why? it would have forced to pay for it closing a loophole used by millionaires. it is called the newt gingrich loophole. what are your priorities? protecting loopholes for millionaires or college education? >> great question. the cost of education is out of sight. we need to have an educated student population. my youngest daughter graduated. i understand. one of the largest driving forces behind the high cost of education is administrative costs. professor war makes about $350 thousand to teach a course. she got a zero interest loan and gets perks. it is interesting. kids are forced to go out and borrow money at
years. we all went to those panels. and i feel like things changed so quickly, the technology has changed things around late, think academia has a very hard time keeping up. and knowing what to tell young journalists to come to the scope what issue do. a year ago they should do everything. this year i'm reading a slew of articles i know, i want specialists again. so i think that's part of what's happening is the world of him in such a rapid pace. >> we also have this switch that with such robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as applied to media was to protect quality, to enforce quality, and to talk about best practices. with the death of the media industry, i mean, it is a death. the grass are just shocking. the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values, the vigilance and other things we care about. and so that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it can't just be about best practices, these great stories rewrote, that that sort of thi thing. >> if you want to become a documentary film maker, where'd y
this when i give talks about china. this is one of the most revolutionary technologies of any kind -- cell phone. it is relevant because there are millions of cell phones in china. we are dealing with immobilize population. they know what is going on and what is happening in their society and in the world. from my discussions with senior officials in the country, they are feeling enormous public pressure. think of the impact on politics of the bo xilai scandal. the son out covorting abroad with various party girls. there have been several high- level scandals that have reinforced what i believe is a growing alienation of the society from the party leadership. as the country enters its fifth generation of leadership, which is about to proceed in a formal way shortly after the election will play out next year, this leadership does face some very fundamental issues. and the open up the political process in dealing with the very substantial measures in the population? that situation will be exacerbated if economic growth slows. the eastern provinces are looking for higher incomes. at in the pr
about china. it's one of the most revolutionary technologies of any time, cell phone. why is it relevant in there are supposedly 400 million cell phones in china. we're dealing with a mobilized population. they know what's going on. they know what is happening in their vote and the world. and from my discussions with senior officials in the country, they're feeling enormous public pressure. think of the impact on politics of the scandal. of seeing [inaudible] the son out cavorting abroad with various party girls, there's been several other high level scandal in the leadership that reinforced what i believe is a growing alienation of the society from the party leadership. and as the country enters its fifth generation leadership, which is about to proceed in a form away shortly after the election and play out early next year, this leadership really does face some very fundamental issues can they open up the political process and dealing with the very substantial measure of distrust in the population. so that situation will be exacerbated if economic growth slows, people will be put out of
this when i give talks about china. this is one of the most revolutionary technologies of any kind, cell phone. why is it relevant? there are supposedly 400 million cell phones in china. we are dealing with a mobilized population. they know what's going on. they know what is happening in their society. and the world. and for my discussions with senior cadre officials in the country, they're feeling a norms public pressure. thing of the impact on politics of the scandal, of seeing the sun out cavorting with berries party girls. there's been several other very high level scandals in the leadership that have reinforced what i believe is a growing alienation of the society from the party leadership. at as the country interest its fifth generation leadership, which is about to proceed in a formal way, shortly after our election and play out early next year, this leadership really does face some very fundamental issues about, can they open up the political process in dealing with the very substantial measure of distrust in the populations. so that situation will be exasperated if economic grow
for us, each of them in uniform have the equipment and technology they need to be able to do their job. that is what we would ensure with mitt romney because he is not going to cut our military. [applause] the president has promised he will raise taxes. he just said that. he said he wants to raise it on millions of small businesses. the experts have said that will result in about 700,000 jobs being lost. jobs we cannot afford to lose. mitt romney has an alternative, which makes a lot of sense. he has said let's do tax reform, simplified the tax code and create more jobs. he did what ronald reagan did. the experts have looked at that and they have said that will create 7 million new jobs. let's talk about this as a choice. 700,000 lost or 7 million gain. which one is better? obama or romney? romney, of course. this is the choice that our fellow citizens are going to make, we are all going to make. sure people know the facts. i believe we have the enthusiasm on our side. i believe if we do our part, we will begin to turn things around. god bless you for what you are doing and for what sh
technologies of the future that will create jobs. unfortunately, the partisanship meant we had a very close vote on the recovery act. candidly, looking back on it, we should have done more on that bill when it passed. secondly, we have a transportation bill that is a little more than two years, only 27 months. it used to be that democrats and republicans would work together to pass more robust transportation bills. to invest across the country so that we are creating jobs and at the same time rebuilding the foundation of the economy. on the transportation bill, one of the reasons it was held up for so long was because the tea party and the house in their ideology kept it from moving forward. i would hope that my opponent, word -- were he to be elected, would say to the tea party that we need to invest in the future, create jobs, and move the economy forward, which means disagreeing with the two-party and investing in infrastructure. >> the fiscal cliff will happen on january 1st of the congress of the united states does nothing before then. but the congress has been getting at practice at d
to rely on technology. we need to be strategic in how we go about -- >> a smaller military then we have now? >> it might be a different military. it might be smaller, but the most important thing for us is to make sure we have a strong economy in the world. that means making sure that we actually get something done and congress can get the economy back on track. i think we need to be able to react very quickly situations around the world, because many of them are much smaller. what we have done in the past, and congressman king is responsible for this, we have been involved in two wars that have taken a huge toll in human life and money as well. our debt is $6 trillion when he went in -- it is $16 trillion now. we put to wars on the credit card. we have to make sure that before we go into conflict, we are prepared to do that. >> let's ask about what you just said -- you can reply to that. then, if you explain your measurement of u.s. power in the world. >> i have been accused of starting two wars. [laughter] >> not paying for them. >> i did not restart those wars. that has been repeated
to be nimble. we need to rely on technology. we need to be strategic in how we go about -- >> a smaller military then we have now? >> it might be a different military. it might be smaller, but the most important thing for us is to make sure we have a strong economy in the world. that means making sure that we actually get something done and congress can get the economy back on track. i think we need to be able to react very quickly situations around the world, because many of them are much smaller. what we have done in the past, and congressman king is responsible for this, we have been involved in two wars that have taken a huge toll in human life and money as well. our debt is $6 trillion when he went in -- it is $16 trillion now. we put to wars on the credit card. we have to make sure that before we go into conflict, we are prepared to do that. >> let's ask about what you just said -- you can reply to that. then, if you explain your measurement of u.s. power in the world. >> i have been accused of starting two wars. [laughter] >> not paying for them. >> i did not restart those wars.
. they were not going to chase good money after bad. they thought technology would lose. now they're back after seeing some of those polls. we have seen millions within the last week alone. there is only so much television time. we're going right down to the stretch. host: what are you hearing from voters? isn't making an impact? caller: i think they do in some way. there would not be spending all this money if they were not. at some point they just become one ad after another. it becomes a rapid fire. someone may think what is going on here? the message is not getting through. they have a tendency to focus and on things the candidates want them to focus on? they do get a message out there. by tuesday voters are tired of it. they're starting to make their mind up. these are going to get more intense. it is going to prove to be the deciding factor. you can read his , here now we will go to a debate between those two candidates running for the senate seat in missouri. this comes to us courtesy of st. louis. the debate is from october 18. it features such her career mc caskill and todd akin.
nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this
change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think macadamia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con goes to talk to a kid. i sometim
debate, president obama touted coal and said we now have a clean coal technology and it should be part of our future energy mix. i agree with him. we have a 300 years' supply in this country. do you still disagree with the president and myself and think that coal is a thing of the past? what would you say to the miners about why their jobs are going to be a thing of the past? >> i grew up in a family of miners. my father was a miner and my grandfather was a miner. it is honest work. i respect greatly those union miners up in northwestern new mexico who do good work. they put food on their family's table. when it comes to policy, i will be looking for the policies that create the most jobs in the future. so when my kids grow up in new mexico, they have a bright future. today, with an industry that she calls the green dream, there are five times as many people working directly in renewables as directly in coal in new mexico. i will not apologize for investing in the future of our energy supply. we should be moving in the direction of domestic and more clean. it is not a dream. 20 years a
are willing to risk their lives for us, each of them in uniform have the equipment and technology they need to be able to do their job. that is what we would ensure with mitt romney because he is not going to cut our military. [applause] the president has promised he will raise taxes. he just said that. he said he wants to raise it on millions of small businesses. the experts have said that will result in about 700,000 jobs being lost. jobs we cannot afford to lose. mitt romney has an alternative, which makes a lot of sense. he has said let's do tax reform, simplified the tax code and create more jobs. he did what ronald reagan did. the experts have looked at that and they have said that will create 7 million new jobs. let's talk about this as a choice. 700,000 lost or 7 million gain. which one is better? obama or romney? romney, of course. this is the choice that our fellow citizens are going to make, we are all going to make. we have to shoreham -- make sure people know the facts. i believe we have the enthusiasm on our side. i believe if we do our part, we will begin to turn things aroun
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